REQUIEM

— OST by Dominik Scherrer

Requiem-OST-Artwork.jpg

TRACKLIST

1. Aigra (02:17)
2. Naaa (01:49)
3. Izraz (02:08)
4. Adopa (01:59)
5. Xpaxn (03:30)
6. Saaiz (01:36)
7. Rgoan (02:16)
8. Erubey (02:00)
9. Edlprnaa (01:56)
10. Lavavoth (01:29)
11. Xai (02:53)
12. Laoaxrp (03:14)
13. Iczhiha (01:04)
14. Lsraphm (03:24)
15. Nlirx (02:48)
16. Omsia (03:41)

ABOUT REQUIEM

Requiem, created by Kris Mrksa and directed by Mahalia Belo, is set in the darkest corners of rural Wales. This brand new psychological thriller series, tells the story of brilliant young cellist Matilda Gray. When her mother inexplicably commits suicide, Matilda discovers tantalising evidence linking her mother to the disappearance of a Welsh toddler 23 years before. When Matilda decides to travel to Wales, determined to explore the link between the two terrible events, her life suddenly spirals into a giant mystery and she starts to obsessively search for her true identity.

ABOUT THE SOUNDTRACK

This newest score by Dominik Scherrer, reinforces both the subtle-scary and supernatural character of 'Requiem'. To compose the original score of this six-episode dark drama series, Dominik collaborated with Bat For Lashes' Natasha Khan.

Dominik Scherrer states: ‘It was an exciting, entertaining script, with an off-beat tone. I loved that the central character, Matilda, is a concert cellist. The cello immediately unlocked the door into the score and justified an element of virtuoso solo cello. The cello often plays in unusually spooky registers, as if it was part of a mysterious Welsh landscape.’

‘Just as the production started principal photography, Natasha Khan and I spent some weeks in my studio in Brick Lane, coming up with themes and recording outlandish vocals and terrifying sounds. There is a cheeky element to the show, as well as a genuinely scary one. Giving a stylistic nod to 1970s lo-fi soundtracks from BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop or 1970s horror soundtracks, together with a pastoral spookiness of the cello and strings themes started to give 'Requiem' its own unique atmosphere.’